Chapter 16 Pesticide Spills

Chapter 16 Pesticide Spills

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Hi . Welcome to the Grower Pesticide
Safety Course. This is Chapter 16, Pesticide Spills. Chapter 16 starts on page
167 of the manual. There 10 slides in this presentation and it will take us about
ten minutes to review them. By the end of this lesson you should be ready to,
define a spill, describe when a spill must be reported, describe how to clean
up a minor spill, a major spill, a spill during transport, and list items to
include in a spill cleanup kit. In spite of all precautions, accidents can happen. It
is important to be prepared to react quickly to a pesticide spill. You need to
learn how to protect yourself and others to reduce human health and environmental
hazards, and minimize damage to crops and buildings. When you’re well prepared, you
can reduce the health and environmental risks. The Pesticides Act and the
Environmental Protection Act protect human health and the natural environment,
and these Acts apply to pesticide spills, in any environment which can cause an
adverse effect and is likely to be worse than the results when the pesticide is
used properly. The Ontario Ministry of Environment and Climate Change
administers these two Acts. The ministry makes sure that spills are cleaned up
right away and as quickly as possible and also makes sure that the natural
environment is restored. So three main points. All spills of
pollutants must be reported to the Ministry of the Environment and Climate
Change, and we have the Spills Action Centtre in place to do that — 1-800 – 268 -6060 and it’s available to us, seven days a week,
24 hours a day. You must report every person who has control of a pollutant
and every person who spills, causes or permits a spill, would have to report
that to the Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change. The second part we need to be aware of is the person in control of the spilled
pollutant must stop the spill contain it clean it up and restore the natural
environment. So this could be the owner or it could be the person beside the
spill, but if they can’t do it themselves they need to contact authorities and
initiate the action to get that spill under control. And finally, the owner or
person in control is responsible for compensating anyone affected for the
losses or damages as a result of the spill. So now let’s learn what a spill is under the definition. And a spill is defined as
a discharge of a pollutant into the natural environment from or out of a
structure vehicle or other container and that is abnormal
in quality or quantity. So must meet all three of those criteria to be considered
a spill, and if you really don’t know it’s always best to phone the Spills
Action Center and ask, and they will respond and tell you where you’re at. The
sooner you report a spill the better. It’s not too good when your neighbour
decides three days later that they are going to report a spill for you. Please
take the initiative and call right away. Best practice for insurance. Insurance
agents recommend that farmers maintain at least two million in pollution
liability coverage and three million in aggregate
pollution liability. So talk to your insurance agent and make sure you’re
covered for pesticide spills. Follow all regulations or your insurance may not
cover you. If you are the victim of the spill, you are entitled to compensation
under the Environmental Protection Act. So you may be a victim of someone
else’s. Now just flipping along here to page 170, minor spills, there’s a certain procedure you can think through but the
first thing you must always do is protect yourself. So we don’t want to
injure a human being, we’ve got a spill happening but protective clothing and
personal protective equipment — please keep that with you if you’re
transporting on the road that’s where the spill might happen, on on a transport
accident. Having equipment there to protect yourself would be useful. Stop
people and animals from entering the area. You want to ventilate the area if
the spill is inside a warehouse or a pesticide storage building. And stop and
contain the spill. Label the secondary container with the trade name, the PCP Act
registration number, and the concentration of each active ingredient. So that’s a regulation that once you’ve cleaned up this minor spill, that if it’s
in a new container, it is well labeled. Even better is to download that pesticide
label from the PMRA label search’ and and put that on the new container. Clean
up the spill following the label directions or the directions on the
Safety Data Sheet. And there is a section for spill cleanup on a Safety Data Sheet.
Major spills — ok we’ve got a larger quantity, we’ve got a really toxic
material. Wear protective clothing and personal protective equipment. Stop
people and animals from entering the area If people have contact with the
pesticide, you’re going to look after them first. Stop their exposure and begin
the first aid if necessary. Stop and contain the spill. Cover the spill with
absorbent material. If you have some close by, you want to stop it from
spreading. Dispose of the hazardous material upon cleanup — that must be
disposed of according to the requirements of the Environmental
Protection Act. Again the Spills Action Centre expertise– the staff there — can
help you determine what to do with that hazardous material, how to get rid of it. I
mentioned earlier that the Safety Data Sheet has information for
decontamination and spill cleanup, and here’s an example.
Accidental Release Measures is Section Six on the Safety Data Sheet and it’ll
say things like this, and we’ll read it together: Pump or scoop large amounts of
liquid into a disposable container. Absorb remaining liquid or smaller
spills with clay, sand or vermiculite. Scoop or sweep up material and place
into a disposable container. Wash the area with detergent and water. Pick up
wash liquid with additional absorbent and place into a compatible disposable
container. On soil, small amounts will naturally decompose. For large amounts
skim off the upper contaminated layer and collect for disposal. Once all
material is cleaned up and placed in a disposal container, seal the container
and arrange for disposal. So on the Safety Data Sheet for a particular
pesticide product, you’re going to have quite a detailed list of the actions you
must take. The Spills Action Centre people, the Ministry of the Environment
and Climate Change will be expecting you to follow that kind of detail when
you’re doing your cleanup. Dealing with the cleanup material, well you may have
some material left over — an absorbent such as kitty litter may have absorbed the
pesticide and now you have that as a hazardous material. You can call the
local Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change office for approval to use
the material, If it’s usable. For example if the pesticide spilled into water, it
may be practical to collect the water and use the mixture according to the
label. If you cannot use the mixture, you would contact a liquid waste remover and
that would be in the yellow pages, in your area, to come and pick it up, and you
can call the Spills Action Centre again to get an emergency waste generator
registration number. And then that will help you with the disposal of the
product properly. The Spill Action Plan we have a sticker available through our
program that puts out just five bullet points of reminder and you can stick
that on your spray tank: Wear protective clothing and equipment. Keep others away. Stop and contain the spill. Report to the municipality and Spills Action Centre. So the Spills Action Centre number is on that sticker, and then proceed with any
cleanup as recommended by the Spills Action Centre. Stickers are available
from the Ontario Pesticide Education Program

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