Venomous Fish (HD) | JONATHAN BIRD’S BLUE WORLD

Venomous Fish (HD) | JONATHAN BIRD’S BLUE WORLD

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Coming up on Jonathan Bird’s Blue World, Jonathan searches the world for the most venomous fish in the sea! Most fish are completely
harmless, but there are a few
species of extremely venomous
fish that can sting. In many cases
this venom so powerful it can
actually kill humans. The most dangerous fish in the
world live on Pacific coral
reefs. Let’s go take a look! Hi, I’m Jonathan Bird and
welcome to my world! ( ♪ music ) Heading down, I begin my search
for venomous fish. Most are
well camouflaged, and hard to find. With much assistance from an
experienced divemaster, I find
a stonefish, well hidden in the
reef. It can change color to match
its surroundings. Unless you
know exactly where to look, you will never see a stonefish
until it moves. Incidentally,
touching a stonefish like this is dangerous. The reef has a few dangerous
characters, and the stonefish
is by far one of the most
dangerous. The expertly camouflaged
stonefish is the deadliest fish
in the world. Its dorsal spines contain a highly toxic venom.
Its body is shaped like a
blob—and it hobbles more than swims. Sometimes stonefish bury
themselves in the sand. They’re
ambush predators—holding perfectly still for hours,
waiting for something
bite-sized to swim by. The stonefish has a sting so
powerful, it can kill a grown
man, and the pain is incredibly severe. The stonefish has a slightly
less toxic relative called a
scorpion fish. It can still
sting humans, but it is rarely fatal.
It’s just really painful. A small group of damselfish are
hovering near the reef. But nearby, watching and not
moving a muscle, is a scorpion
fish. His perfect camouflage is the result of skin that can
change color to match the
surroundings. The only thing that gives him
away is the slight movement of
his gills as he breathes. On top of his body, his dorsal
fin contains the venomous
spines –-the armor to back up the camouflage. He is watching the
damselfish—who are blissfully
unaware of his presence. Soon a Damselfish comes too
close. Not far away, I find a lionfish
hiding in the coral. If those
needles all over the fish look sharp, I can assure you
it’s because they are. Not only
that, each one is like an independent syringe, ready
to inject venom into any animal
foolish enough to try to eat a lionfish. Almost nothing can
prey on these fish once they
are fully developed. During the day they generally
don’t do much. But at night,
things change. A small fish on the sand is
blissfully unaware of the
predator emerging from the
darkness. Like its namesake, the lionfish
pounces on prey and easily
consumes its victim in a single gulp. Small fish don’t stand a
chance. Not far away from the reef, an
area of rubble and sand
provides a habitat for a
well-camouflaged predator. The Spiny Devilfish is almost
invisible if it doesn’t move. But the hunting has not been so
good here, so it’s off to a
better spot. The Devilfish crawls along the
bottom using modified pectoral
fin spines as feet. The Spiny Devilfish sees a
potential snack. Unfortunately a Line-cheek
wrasse saw it too. The Devilfish is not pleased. Not far away, a scorpion fish
is doing its best to look like
a rock. A damselfish barely escapes—but
not without injury. The
scorpion fish goes hungry… …but the Spiny Devilfish
caught some luck. The injured
damselfish has taken a turn for the worse. Although the stonefish,
scorpion fish and lionfish are
the most venomous fish in the ocean, they actually account
for very few injuries to
people. The fact is that if you leave them alone, they’ll leave
you alone too. Many more divers are injured by
sea urchins, jellyfish and
crown-of-thorns sea stars than by venomous fish…but that’s a
story for another day. ( ♪ music )

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